‘Overall, ‘While in grad school, I was a curriculum and instruction major; coincidentally, I worked as a writing tutor.


Just to let you know, if you’ve got a degree already, working as a tutor of the discipline you are studying works out great, if you are an LD individual, due to the fact that you can’t escape your subject matter.


When you’re in class, you’re hearing, reading and thinking about the topic; then, when you’re tutoring people who are engaged in classes that are delving into the same topic, it forces you to eat, sleep, live and defecate the topic.)


This is true as, you, as a learning disabled individual, without even trying, receive mounds and mounds of communicated reinforcement and repetition of the concepts you are studying.


I did this to get a master’s degree, and, as I took classes, I recognized things a-bout the curricula I tutored students as to.


The thing I was able to recognize, not that long after I started tutoring on the university level was that there was something suspicious about the English 101 curriculum.


All of the sudden, I saw that, in assisting students with there writing tasks, there were relatively few responses to assignments that I was called upon to attend to that, as far as what screeched to be amended, wasn’t able to be addressed, quite easily.


For most any individual, much less, for learning disabled individuals, the customarily-used community college- and university-level English 101 curriculum can be an incredibly difficult course in which to succeed. Personally, a trillion years, before I entered grad school, where I wrote curricula that enable students greater ease when they are required to perform writing acts, I received an A in English 101, as an LD student.


Knowing what I now know about the true nature of the rhetoric-driven English 101 programs that exist at most institutions of higher learning, I am utterly surprised.


This was while I was still finishing high school; I went, part-time, to the community college across the road, after I endured fourth period of my fifth year of high school courses. It was hoped that taking an extra year would give my brain more time to heal, prior to attempting undergrad school


After four years of college prep, I had a 3.7 GPA; after a fifth, I graduated with a 3.68 GPA. (No, I never have considered what GPA I would have achieved, had I not had my giant stroke; yet, thank you for not asking. (wink-wink))


However, in my English 101 class I took at the community college, I received an A, as an individual who, about a year before, had approximately one half of his brain removed.


To tell the truth, I know I did not use an outline for any of that course’s assignment that I wrote; however, somehow, I got an A from the stranger who taught the class.


This was, despite the fact that, unbeknownst to me, I had a shiny, brand newly-acquired short-term-memory deficit. Apparently, the fact that I would hear something, one minute and, 15 seconds later, I would not remember having heard it, did not thwart me from excelling in the curriculum.


Sometimes, I would hear a message that, prior to my STROKE, I would have had no problem handling all the components of, and, now, would need to receive several repetitions of the communication, before I would be able to carry out all the instructions.


I was, sometimes, usually, about 50 percent accurate. Sometimes, I was about 65 percent accurate…other times, I was only about 25 percent accurate. Having a stroke-created short-term-memory deficit is tragically miserable. It messes with many parts of all your interactions.


English 101, for me, was strangely easy. Why this was, I am not sure. However, the fact that I was able to get an A in the rhetoric-intensive class could be a sign that rhetoric is not the right thing to use for entry-level students. In the several years that I tutored students, engaged in the curriculum: out of the blue, I became aware of the true nature of the course.


It is a specific type of writing that’s expected of a student writer; only, I’m not sure many English 101 profs are aware of it.


As a grad student, due to my having worked for multiple years as a writing tutor of students who were enrolled in English 101, poetry analysis and Junior-level English courses, one semester, I decided to infuse my tutoring experience and methods into my coursework.


Outlining was the vehicle I used, as an alternative to communicate and teach students (especially learning disabled students) how, successfully, to create rhetorical, written communication.


The reason why Outlining works for this purpose is the fact that it enables a writer to maintain communicative balance in his or her communication, (almost) out of necessity.


The slightly tragic part about the entry-level writing curriculum at most schools is the fact it, when mastered by students, most-readily, equips them with rhetorical/dialogic communication abilities that can be applied to either speech writing or to teaching rhetoric.


What I came to hypothesize while tutoring writers, on the community college and university levels,  was that the assignments that comprised the entry-level curricula were, in reality, rhetorical, in nature and, as well, were only a part of what writing, much less communication, was all about.


The fact is that a Learning Disabled individual can easily bypass stress and confusion if he or she accepts the reality that, even if his or her professor and/or prof/TA is the most benevolent and well-meaning individual or duo on earth, there is a much easier way to succeed, as an entry-level collegiate writing student. Here is how to do just that. You utilize a complete sentence as the title of your outline.


The most efficient way to allow your audience to follow your writing’s intended meaning is for you to use rhetorical cues; these are what, in elementary and middle school, you learned to recognize as “TRANSITIONS”.


Transitions are what allow your reader(s) to determine where your communication’s meaning is going, before it actually goes there. It is my personal hypothesis that the effective use of transitions, in conjunction with one’s willingness to review what he or she has written and determine the nonexistence of any “careless” mistakes is the true key to doing well in, especially, English 101 class.


Transitions have varying types, such as:


Overall,; First,; First of all,; Secondly,; However,; Lastly,; In conclusion,


When one use the outlining process to plan his or her composition process, these top-level transitions take the place of Roman numerals, (I., II., III., IV., V.) in your outline.


The next level (second-tier) represent- ations, in your Outline, (A., B., C., D., E.), signify a different level of specificity of transitions (rhetorical/dia logic cues) They signify the provision of more detail of the topic about which you are writing.


These stand for words, like: As well,; Additionally,; Too,; Moreover,; Too,


The third tier rhetorical/dialogic cues (transitions) are used to communicate the specific details that correspond to the multiple aspects of the aspects of your topic. Accordingly, these are signified by the symbols, (1., 2., 3., 4., 5.).


If your communication of your topic goes into further detail, you continue your outline, using the appropriate numbering and/or lettering, as is required.


With each consecutive detail that is connected to the same overarching concept, you simply use a term that matches up.


If you’re communicating the first detail, you use “First,” or “First of all,“.


The second detail causes you to utilize “Second,“, “Secondly,“, “Next,” or whatever is the best wording for you to use. Then, when you get to the end of your information you’re writing about, you need, usually, to consider the same information you have been writing about, from a different perspective.


Now, the extremely incredible part about the act of using a sentence outline, as your go-to pre-writing task method for organizing your notes, is the fact that all you will have to do is replace each of the Roman numerals, letters and numbers with appropriate, prone rhetorical cues.


Overall, the great thing about using an outline to plan your essay is the fact that, as a pre-writing tactic, it is utterly foolproof by virtue of the fact that it allows you to know that your essay is well-balanced.


It being true that, the specificity of your outline corresponds to the inherent specificity your essay and, if one uses a complete sentence outline, all he or she must do is use it, replacing all of the Numerals, numbers and letters, with prone, corresponding rhetorical/dialogic cues (transitions.)


The thing about the Outlining process that facilitates great ease is the fact that it is perfectly suited to establishing and maintaining perfect balance in your writing; this is incredibly useful for making it possible establishing and maintaining balance and coherence.


The Claude Monet Exhibit


As I was in the last throes of my BA, I had a chance to attend an exhibit of Claude Monet’s paintings that were on display at the Baltimore Museum of Art. These were gigantic works, produced on massive canvases. Luckily, I had attended the exhibit with a friend who was, at the time, an Art History major.


Even though the rooms within the BMA where the paintings were hanged were pretty enormous, I had to be cued in to the reality that, when viewing these types of works, one can get a fairly mind-opening /mind-blowing vantage of the paintings, if he or she steps back as far away from where the artwork hangs and blurs his or her vision (I squinted).


Conceptually, at one point in time, during my graduate program, as I was working as a writing tutor who met with and helped zillions of students become disentangled from what they experienced, wading through the first foundation course that the institution “offered”, something clicked and I realized that the curriculum that I, most usually, was expected to tutor /teach, “English 101”, was really rhetorical.


Upon analyzing this epiphany, I realized that students could easily be assisted in achieving higher grades in the foundation class if they were provided a tweaked form of the instruction that they were being provided.


When I was in English 101, I was called upon to write a number of connected papers in the format of Pro/Con and what this meant was that I had to introduce a topic and talk about (write about) the subject, communicating, first, the positive aspects of a topic or situation.


Then, I had to write about the existing negative aspects of the same topic or situation; then, I was called upon to analyze, in writing, which aspects (positive or negative) were more valid and, finally, communicate be airtight rationale for my final analysis.


After thinking about it, and realizing that students’ responses were being likely being graded upon the ease which their professors or TA’s experienced, while reviewing them, I thought about the most foolproof method for assisting students, especially learning disabled students, with the act of not being graded down and, thereby, having their initial higher education writing experience cause them to adopt the belief that writing was beyond their potential acquisition.


I remember, prior to having written this essay, personally believing that the act of forcing a student to write a sentence outline, as opposed to a phrase outline, was just the act of a teacher’s malevolence; however, the sake of writing rhetoric or speech writing, the use of a sentence outline is amazingly useful.


The reason why I say this is the fact that an individual can easily convert his or her sentence outline into fluidly worded communication, with great ease. I do not believe that this is widely known, otherwise I feel as though teachers, beyond the elementary school level, would insist upon its usage.


Potentially, this is only applicable to teaching coherent writing skills to learning disabled individuals; however, it’s my opinion that it is applicable to succinctly teaching rhetorical writing skills, assuredly, to all people. Instead of using Monet’s brush-strokes, some- times, Seurat’s technique might need to be used.


Pro/Con:


If you use complete sentences, you can experience amazing, additional ease, due to the fact that the complete sentence outline, when the bench-marks are replaced with appropriate “rhetorical/dialogic cues”, i.e.: transitions, is 95-99 percent complete. The following communication illustrates how this is true.


The Title of your outline acts as the introduction to your essay’s topic and, therefore, must be in COMPLETE SENTENCE FORM.


This is followed by a complete sentence that acts as your introduction and thesis statement that segues into a:



I. (Top-level Rhetorical/Dialogic Cue), Introduction to/Statement of the Topic, utilizing a coherent, balanced, complete sentence.


II. This is followed by a (Top-Level Rhet-orical/Dialogic Cue), a subsequent State-ment that asserts the proneness of (I.), in complete sentence form.


III. is replaced with a rhetorical cue that communicates “However”, followed by a comma (,), then continues on to state that (I.) could be off-task, in complete sentence form.


IV. is replaced with a (Top-Level Rhetorical/Dialogic Cue) that mirrors that in II.’s Rhetorical/Dialogic, followed by a complete sentence that communicates the process of the opposite of what is asserted in (I.) and (II.).


V. is replaced by a culminating Rhetoric-al/Dialogic Cue that communicates “All In All” and is followed by a comma and a complete sentence that provides you final take on your Topic.


(In between the capital Roman Numerals and the capital letters will be connective complete sentence communication that links the two)


A. Second-tier rhetorical cue, followed by a complete sentence that asxwwserts one’s take on the topic, about which is being written.


1. Third-tier rhetorical cue, followed                    by a complete sentence that as-              serts the proneness of what has been      asserted, (in A.). (In between this level and the previous level will be information that’s produced in  complete sentences.)


a. A Fourth-tier rhetorical cue,                followed by a complete sentence                that agrees with what has been asserted in  (1.) or that disagrees with what has been asserted in (1.).


i. a fifth-tier rhetorical cue, followed                               by a comma(,), continuing                        on, after that, with a complete sentence.


ii. a fifth-tier rhetorical cue,                    followed by another sentence that agrees with the sentiment of (i.).


iii. a rhetorical cue that communicates “however”, followed by a comma(,)that replaces  “iii.” and is followed by a complete sentence that communicates the possibility that what is suggested in   “a.” could be, ultimately, on task.


iv. a rhetorical cue that communicates                           a similar, yet antithetic                               sentiment as that in (i.), followed by a complete sentence.


v. a summarizing rhetorical cue,                             followed by a final take                                      on (a.), in complete sentence form.


b. Another fourth-tier rhetorical                     cue, followed by a complete                           sentence that aligns with what                     has been asserted in 1.


i. a fifth-tier rhetorical cue,                              followed by a comma and                                continued on after that with                          the assertion in complete                              sentence form, that aligns                            with what is communicated in                      b., directly above.


ii. a fifth-tier rhetorical cue,                              followed by a comma and                                continued on after that with a                       further assertion, in complete                                    sentence form, that what is communicated in b. is on-task.


iii. a rhetorical cue that                                         communicates “Yet” or                                   “Although” or “However”,                           followed by a comma. This is                         followed by a complete                                   sentence that suggests that                           what is communicated in b.                           might not be true.


vi. a rhetorical cue, followed by a                       complete sentence that                                   suggests what is communicated                               in b.is flawed.


v. a summarizing rhetorical cue,                       followed by a complete sent-                       ence that communicates an                           analysis of what was asserted                       in b..


c. A rhetorical cue that means                           “However,” followed by a com-                    plete sentence that states that                    what has been asserted in 1.                          could be wrong and that an                            opposing view could be more                        prone.


i. A rhetorical cue, such as, “In                        reality”, followed by a comma                      ‘,’ and a complete sentence                           that communicates that the                         opposite of b. could be prone.


ii. A rhetorical cue, such as, “As                       well”, followed by a comma ‘,’                     and a sentence that suggests                         that the opposite of b. could                         be prone.


iii. A rhetorical cue that comm-                         unicates “yet”, followed by a                         comma ‘,’ and a complete                             sentence that suggests b.                               could be prone.


iv. A rhetorical cue that comm-                         unicates agreement with the suggestion            that the sentiment of (iii.) is prone.


v. is replaced with an overarching                                   rhetorical cue that signifies that the communication that follows                         is final.


d. A rhetorical cue, like, “As well,”                  or “Too,”, for example, followed                  by a complete sentence that                          states the  possibility that an                        alternative take on 1. is or could                  be prone.


i.  A rhetorical cue, such as “First”                  followed by a comma and a complete        sentence that communicates an                  alternative take on 1. and the fact that      it   could be prone.


ii.  A rhetorical cue, such as”Secondly”           or “Second of all”, followed by                     complete sentence that commun-             icates additional   information on the       same level which says the same                   sentiment of the previously-men-.           tioned, alternative take on 1. and the         reality that it could be prone.


iii. A rhetorical cue that communicates           “Yet” or “Only”  or “But”, followed            by a   comma(,) and a complete                    sentence that suggests that the                    opposite to 1. could be prone.


iv. A rhetorical cue that communicates           “Overall” or “Essentially”, for                      example,   followed, directly, by a                comma and a complete sentence that        asserts the idea that what was                      communicated in 1. is off-task


v. A culminating rhetorical cue that                communicates “Finally”, followed by a comma and a complete sentence              that communicates the final take on          the overall essay topic.


Pro/Pro


i. Experience


ii. Experience With Evidence


iii. The Other Side


iv. Comprehensive Experience


v.


c.


i.


ii.


iii.


iv.


v.


d.


i.


ii.


iii.


iv.


v.


e.


i.


ii.


iii.


iv.


v.


b.


i.


ii.


iii.


iv.


v.


c.


i.


ii.


iii.


iv.


v.


d.


i.


ii.


iii.


iv.


v.


e.


i.

ii.

iii.

iv.

v.


2.


a.


b.


c.


d.


e.


3.


a.


b.


c.


d.


e.


4.


a.


b.


c.


d.


e.


5.


a.


b.


c.


d.


e.


B. A second-tier rhetorical cue


C.


D.

E.

II. (Secondary-level rhetorical/Dialogic            Cue: Declaration of thesis)

A.

  1. Initial statement of your “personal” take on the subject, utilizing a coherent, balanced, complete
  2. sentence.
    a.
    b.
    c.
    d.                                                       e.

B. Substantiation of thesis, utilizing a coherent, balanced, complete sentence.
1.
2.
3.
4.                                                                           5.

C. Provision of plausibility of alternate view of topic, utilizing a coherent, balanced, complete sentence.
1.
2.
3.
4.                                                                           5.
D. Additional support of alternate view, utilizing a coherent, balanced, complete sentence.
1.
2.
3.
4.                                                                           5.

E. Declaration of the Superior point of view, utilizing a coherent, balanced, complete sentence.

1. Supposition of the inferior point of view’s validity utilizing a coherent, balanced, complete sentence.

2. Statement of the conclusive superiority of the superior point of view, utilizing a coherent,

balanced, complete sentence.

3. Final, concluding communication of the realization/findings
II.

A.

1.
2.
3.
4.

5.

III. This is where you need to communicate the potential that the opposite or maybe just alternative point of view might be valid. In order to provide your reader the knowledge that his or her mindset could be incorrect, you will need to use a transition or rhetorical cue that lets your reader know that his or her first idea that is mind could be off or completely opposite to what the real facts are. These are: However,; Yet,; But, etc.

IV.

V. Conclusion: (EXIGENCE)

Pro/Pro:

Experience, Experience  w/Evidence, Experience and other Evidence, The Other Side, Comprehensive Experience Paper. (In reality, the fact that the medium (rhetoric) is being utilized as a standard for “excellence”, it is able to be determined that, A. the curriculum does not provide writers usable writing skills, and, B. that the communicated instruction that is provided by “composition” professors who are grading for excellence in composition are, in reality, not doing so, by virtue of the rhetoric/dialogic communication goal being much more readily accomplished. LD students, easily, are left out in the cold, by virtue of this mismatch that is never addressed.)

For most any individual, much less, for learning disabled individuals, the customarily-used community college- and university-level English 101 curriculum can be incredibly difficult in which to succeed. Personally, a trillion years before I entered grad school, where I wrote curricula that enable students to experience greater ease when they are required to perform writing acts, I, somehow, received an A in English 101, as an LD student.

In reality, Outlining was the vehicle I used as an alternative to communicate and teach students (especially learning disabled students) how, successfully, to create rhetorical, written communication.

The reason why Outlining works for this purpose is the fact that it enables a writer to maintain communicative balance in his or her communication, (almost) out of necessity.

The slightly tragic part about the entry-level writing curriculum at most schools is the fact it, when mastered by students, most-readily, equips them with rhetorical / dialogic communication abilities that can be applied to speech writing, to delivering speeches or to teaching rhetoric.

What I came to hypothesize while tutoring writers, on the community college and university levels,  was that the assignments that comprised the entry-level curricula were, in reality, rhetorical, in nature and, as well, were only a part of what writing, much less communication, was all about.

In reality, all one has to do is utilize an outlining system, similar to what I’m communicating, currently, and he or she should be able to do pretty well in the intro to composition class that is required is by most colleges and universities. In fact, a student could fare spectacularly.

Introduction: this segues into the body of your essay back allows your reader to know the overall topic about which you are writing.

  1. First of all, Initially,
  2. Secondly,  As well,
  3. However, Yet, On the other hand,

IV.

V. (EXIGENCE)

A.,

B.,

C.,

D.,

E.

1.,

2.,

3.,

4.,

5.

a.,

b.,

c.,

d.,

e.

i.,

ii.,

iii.,

iv.,

v.

Experience, Experience W/Evidence, The Other Side, Composite Experience Assignment

Thesis Statement

I., II., III., IV., V.

I. First of all,

A. Specifically,

1.

2.

B.

1.

2.

II. Secondly,

A.

1.

2.

B.

1.

2.

III. However,

A.

1.

2.

B.

1.

2.

IV. As well,

A.

1.

2.

B.

1.

2.

V. In conclusion, (EXIGENCE)

VI. Wrap up

For most any individual, much less, for learning disabled individuals, the customarily-used community college- and university-level English 101 curriculum can be incredibly difficult in which to succeed. Personally, a trillion years before I entered grad school, where I wrote curricula that enable students to experience greater ease when they are required to perform writing acts, I, somehow, received an A in English 101, as an LD student.

In reality, Outlining was the vehicle I used as an alternative to communicate and teach students (especially learning disabled students) how, successfully, to create rhetorical, written communication.

The reason why Outlining works for this purpose is the fact that it enables a writer to maintain communicative balance in his or her communication, (almost) out of necessity.

The slightly tragic part about the entry-level writing curriculum at most schools is the fact it, when mastered by students, most-readily, equips them with rhetorical / dialogic communication abilities that can be applied to speech writing, to delivering speeches or to teaching rhetoric.

What I came to hypothesize while tutoring writers, on the community college and university levels,  was that the assignments that comprised the entry-level curricula were, in reality, rhetorical, in nature and, as well, were only a part of what writing, much less communication, was all about.

In reality, all one has to do is utilize an outlining system, similar to what I’m communicating, currently, and he or she should be able to do pretty well in the intro to composition class that is required is by most colleges and universities. In fact, a student could fare spectacularly.

Introduction: this segues into the body of your essay back allows your reader to know the overall topic about which you are writing.

  1. First of all, Initially,
  2. Secondly,  As well,
  3. However, Yet, On the other hand,

IV.

V. In conclusion, (EXIGENCE)

A.,

1.,

2.,

3.,

4.,

5.

B.,

1.,

2.,

3.,

4.,

5.

C.,

1.,

2.,

3.,

4.,

5.

D.,

1.,

2.,

3.,

4.,

5.

E.

1.,

2.,

3.,

4.,

a.,

i.,

ii.,

iii.,

iv.,

v.

b.,

c.,

d.,

i.,

ii.,

iii.,

iv.,

v.

5.

a.,

b.,

c.,

d.,

i.,

ii.,

iii.,

iv.,

v.

Thesis Statement

I., II., III., IV., V.

I. First of all,

A.,

1.,

2.,

3.,

4.,

5.

B.,

1.,

2.,

3.,

4.,

5.

C.,

1.,

2.,

3.,

4.,

5.

D.,

1.,

2.,

3.,

4.,

5.

E.

1.,

2.,

3.,

4.,

5.

1.

2.

B.

1.

2.

II. Secondly,

A.

1.

2.

B.

1.

2.

III. However,

A.

1.

2.

B.

1.

2.

IV. As well,

A.

1.

2.

B.

1.

2.

V. In conclusion,

VI. Wrap up

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