The Use of Poetic Scansion in Conjunction with Word Paletting and Outlining to Equip Writers with the Ability to Scan, Analyze and Write About Poetry, Connecting and Leading them to Acquire the Means for Applied Research Writing



As a pre-writing strategy, poetic scansion is amazingly prone to get any writer over the obstacle of “writer’s block”.


I must have written at least 100 or 200 poems, if not more, in the interim between my final stroke and the six-month point after my craniotomy.


Due to how devastated my short-term memory was, I really was not able to succeed, to my fullest extent, academically, based on the fact that, in order to acquire knowledge and demonstrate that you have successfully learned, you must be able to regurgitate, in real-time, what you have been, most-recently, baby-birded: mama bird beak to baby bird gullet.


Word Paletting 1: ‘contacts’, has writers create their own palette, stemming from an established fulcrum term, then has them produce a work of worded art by continuing to communicate, using and including subsequent words, from off the palette, to proceed the spread of their poetic wildfire.


To start the fire, of course, they use kindling they’ve already mustered in the wilderness of their minds and leave, behind, any and all hints of the method they used to start the fire and abandon any extraneous, pesky, burdock turns-of-phrase, too. “I like to think, right now, please, of a cybernetic meadow where deer stroll past computers and flowers have spinning blossoms…”


Word Paletting 2: ‘tails’, is similar to wp1, in that, it has writers construct their own stockpile of communicative ammunition, before addressing the act of writing; only, once they get the ballpoints of their pens rolling, instead of infusing just palette terms, writers infuse, both, palette terms and anchor terms, giving the reader of the poem a repetitive, mesmerizing effect, while initiating the writers’ abilities to insert and synthesize outside information, with quotes or cited intellectual property into a working body.


Word Paletting 3: ‘llamas’ is a non-pressure-contingent means for students to achieve effective concluding statements without the rhetoric-contingent paradox or sequence of Experience papers’ expectation that writers communicate an opposite stance on a chosen topic.


Word Paletting 4: ‘orcas’ is a method that uses words that are connected to one another, in commonly-occuring, organic speech, allowing its user to make “the mundane really pop” and gives the writer more incentive to focus on what he or she is outputting.


Word Paletting 5: ‘apples’ is a method for producing poetry that mimicks one’s use of sourced intellectual property and actual quoted information that is compiled, outside of his or her working body, such to stockpile it until he or she can determine where it can be inserted, after his or her research writing has been nearly completed. Also, it allows for the communication, in application to the writer’s previously-held thesis and contentions, to be renegotiated.


Word Paletting 6: ‘socialist butterflies’, below, uses a near miss, ‘socialist’ as opposed to ‘social’ to jab at political differences and misunderstandings and misperceptions.


social -ist butter -flies


on solo-flights,


(paradox: gregarious)


have let them (typography)


-selves (homophone)


bee (insect/homophone)


-dazz-led (breaking “dazzled”, up, to  


add dimension and meaning.


[bedazzled/be led]) by an ideal of


environs “and”,  signified by “&(,) not 


“AND”, in flight, mayfly (insect)


or flea to flames,)  (insect/moth)(consonance


/alliteration), wherein, they make


“relations,spatial” (special) relations 


(wink, wink, nod, nod chicanery’ 


suggestion); tho'(informality) honesty mite


(insect) override & let them find a lee to


flea (insect), wherein to flit (insect) &


(ampersand, as opposed to “AND”,


to heighten the idea of time is money    


and the paradox of the sentiment of the


poem, in conjunction with its denotat-


ive implication/implied communication)


find, at least, (suggested duplicity) 


another’s stake to claim & (ampersand, 


as opposed to “AND”,) call their own


(claim jumper reference)



social -ist butter -flies


on solo-flights,


have let them -selves


bee -dazz-led


by an ideal of environs &(,) 


in flight, mayfly or


flea  to flames,     


wherein, they make


“relations,spatial”;    


tho’, honesty mite over


-ride & let them find a lee to


flea, wherein to flit  & find,


at least, another’s steak


to claim & call their own


    WordPaletting  07:


hybridization of wp1


‘contacts in a universe’ and wp5 ‘apples’


Word Paletting 08: hybridization of


wp2 ‘loose tailes’ and wp3 ‘llamas’


Word Paletting 09: hybridization of wp4


‘orcas’ and wp6 ‘socialist butterflies’


Word Paletting 10: hybridization of wp1


‘contacts’, wp3 ‘llamas’ and outlining


Word Paletting 11:


    eye’ve never cast sew many lions


Word Paletting 12:


socialist butterflies


This is a writing method that


utilizes wording in common


speech that


connect to other


communicative statements, in


order to create a


creatively-written, finished


product.


Word Paletting 13:


            hybrid of wp2 ta(i)l[e]s,


wp3 llamas, wp4 orcas and Outlining


Word Paletting 14: hybridization of wp 2’tailes’, wp 5’apples’ and Outlining.


Poetic Scansion: is a procedure, by which LD individuals can unlock meaning from “the best words, in their best order” and assemble this meaning, such to write, coherently about that which the have determined to be inherent within the verse they are considering.


Outlining


The title of your outline is the introductory sentence of your essay.


I. Replace the Roman numeral “I.”,


with an introductory cue, followed


by a comma and a complete sentence


that states a opinion on the Topic about


about which you are writing.


For example:


(First of all,), (Overall,), (As a rule,);


then, follow this up with a complete


sentence, replacing the “A.” with a


prone second-tier rhetorical cue


that aligns with either take on “I.”.


1. Follow this with a rhetorical cue


that will lead to the assertion,


communicated in complete sentence


form that aligns with the take of A..


a. Then, this is followed by a rhetorical


cue,”First of all”, followed by a


comma and a complete sentence.


b. A rhetorical cue, such as, “As


Well”, followed by a comma.


c. A rhetorical cue that means “How-


ever”, followed by a comma and a


complete sentence that communi-


cates the opposite view to that


which was communicated in 1.


could be prone.


d. A rhetorical cue that communicates


“In reality” that is followed, immed-


iately, by a complete sentence that


aligns with c., from above.


e. A rhetorical cue that communicates


“All in all”, followed by a comma


and a complete sentence that aligns


with your chosen take on 1..


2. Follow this with a rhetorical cue that


agrees with what is communicated in


(1.) and a complete sentence.


a. A rhetorical cue, for example, “First”


or “First of all”, followed by a com-


ma and a complete sentence, agree-


ing with what is communicated in (1.).


b. A rhetorical cue that communicates


“as well”, followed by a complete


sentence that agrees with (1.).


c. A rhetorical cue that communi-


cates the sentiment of “But” or “How-


ever”, and a comma (,), followed by a


complete sentence that asserts that the


potential for what has been communic-


ated in (1.) to have been flawed.


d. A rhetorical cue that communicates


“In reality” or “Truly”, for example,


followed by a complete sentence that


communicates that the opposite of (1.)


could be on-task.


e. Follow this up with a culminating


rhetorical cue, followed by a complete


sentence that  communicates your


final take on 1..


3. Use a rhetorical cue that means


“However”, “Yet” or “But” and follow it,


directly, with a comma (,) and the


assertion that in A. might be incorrect,


in complete sentence form.


a. Use a rhetorical cue that means “In


reality” or “Truly” and follow it  directly


with a comma and a complete sentence


sentence that states in what way the


repute of the communication of A. is


potentially off-task.


b. Use a rhetorical cue that articulates


further reasoning that the sentiment


of A. could be flawed.


c. Use a rhetorical cue that means “As


well” or “Too”, followed by a comma


and a complete sentence that provides


information as to the reality that A.


could be flawed.


d. Use a rhetorical cue that means “And”


that’s followed by a complete sentence


that articulates subsequent, more infor-


mation that suggests that the sentiment


in A. could be flawed.


e. Use a culminating rhetorical cue,


followed by a final statement as to


whether or not the sentiment in A.is or


is not flawed.


4. Use rhetorical cue that means


“Also” or “Too” and follow it, directly,


directly, with a comma (,) and a


complete, subsequent sentence that


asserts that A.’s assertion might


be incorrect.


a. First, followed by a complete sentence


that asserts how your take on A.


might be flawed. “First,” takes the


place of “a.”.


b. Secondly, followed by a complete


sentence that communicates further


information as to how your take on A.


could be flawed. “Secondly,” takes the


place of “b.”.


c. Third, followed by a complete sent


-ence that communicates further


information as to how your take on A.


could be flawed. “Third,” or “As well,”


takes the place of “c.”.


d. Fourth, followed by complete


sentence that communicates further


information as to how your take on A.


could be flawed. “Fourth,” or “Too,”


takes the place of “d.”.


e. Fifth, followed by a complete sent-


ence to communicate further data.


as to how your take on A. could be


flawed. “Overall,”, “In summation,” et


cetera takes the place of “e.”.


5. Use a rhetorical cue that means


“All in all” or “In conclusion”,


followed by a comma (,) your final take


on A. Follow this up with a complete


sentence, replacing the “B.” with a


prone second-tier rhetorical cue.


1. Remove the (1.), replacing it with a


prone rhetorical cue, such as “First” or


“First of all”, followed by a comma and


a complete sentence.


2. Remove the (2.), replacing it with a


prone rhetorical cue such as “As well”


or “Too”, followed, directly, by a comma.


3. Remove the 3., replacing it with a


rhetorical cue that communicates


that which the word, “However”,


does and continue on, with a complete


sentence that denotes that which has


been communicated in B., could be off.


4. Remove the 4., and insert a rhetor-


ical cue that communicates “In reality”


or “Truly”, followed by a comma and


followed by a complete sentence that


provides communication that goes


against the grain of what is communicat


-ed in 1., above.


5. Remove the 5., and replace it with a


final, culminating rhetorical cue,


that is followed by a complete sentence


that communicates your final take on B.


C. Follow this up with a comma, after a


rhetorical cue that means “However”


and follow this with a comma and


a complete sentence, communicating


the sentiment that the point of view that


is expressed in “I.” could be wrong.


1. Follow this up with a rhetorical cue,


such as, “In reality”,  followed by a


comma, and a complete sentence


that asserts how the antithesis of


“I.” is more prone.


2. Another rhetorical cue, on the same level of specify as that, used in “1.”,  followed by a complete sentence that aligns with what is communicated in C. (or the antithesis of I.)


3. A rhetorical cue that communicates the sentiment of “However”, followed by a comma and a complete sentence whose sentiment goes against the grain of the sentiment of C.


4. A rhetorical cue, such as, “In reality” or “Truly” followed by a comma and complete sentence that continues to contradict the sentiment of C.


5. A rhetorical cue, such as, “Overall”, followed by a comma and a complete sentence that communicates your final take on C.


D. Remove the D, replacing it with a rhetorical cue that is followed by a comma, then a rhetorical cue, such as, “As well”, followed by a comma, and a complete sentence that continues on with the assertion that what is asserted in C., from above, is incorrect.


1.  Remove the (1.) and insert a prone rhetorical cue, such as “First” or “First of all”, followed by a comma and a complete sentence that articulates why the information that is asserted in C., from above, is incorrect.


2. Remove the (2.) and insert a prone rhetorical cue, such as “Secondly” or “As well”, followed by a comma and a complete sentence that continues the sentiment of the communication in (1.).


3. Remove the (3.) And insert a rhetorical cue that communicates “But”, followed by a complete sentence that suggest that the opposite to what has just been communicated, previously, is prone.


4. Remove the (4.), replacing it with a complete sentence that holsters the concept that the opposite to what has just been communicated in (C.) is potentially prone.


5.  Remove the (5.), offering a sentence that communicates a final take on (C.)


E. Remove the E., replacing it with a rhetorical cue that is followed by a comma. The rhetorical cue that is used, here, communicates that the finding that is offered communicates one’s final assessment on that which has been written about.


Essentially, there are some things that English 101/102 profs impose on students that rarely come into play under normal life’s circumstances. One of these is the requirement that writers include “exigence” in their writing.


When I tutored a writer through this arrow/sling, the first time, I looked at the word, “exigence”, and knew that it looked like it was connected to “exit”. Then, I researched it and found out that to utilize “exigence”, as a writer, one needs to divulge how the topic about which he or she is writing connects to a greater arena or plane of existence.


I remember having assisted a competit-


ive cheerleader with his or her exigence


on his or her series of essays, prompting


him or her to think about the competit-


ive cheerleading experience as being


 able to be connected to teamwork,


having a good attitude and physical


fitness, simultaneously.


This, was connected to the idea of,  in


the workforce, the more pleasant


coworker is one who is able to maintain


a positive outlook and is able to main-


tain perseverance, through any work-


place dilemma, in conjunction with his


or her ability to work  well with others,


in order not to have a metaphoric


human pyramid come crashing to the


ground, while leading the initiative and


mission of an entire office to fail.


Advertisements

2 thoughts on “The Use of Poetic Scansion in Conjunction with Word Paletting and Outlining to Equip Writers with the Ability to Scan, Analyze and Write About Poetry, Connecting and Leading them to Acquire the Means for Applied Research Writing

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s